Bipartisan 2018 Farm Bill Makes Critical Investments for Historically Underserved Farmers and Ranchers, Farm Land Preservation, and Ensures Healthy Food Access for All Communities

For immediate release

December 11, 2018

Contacts: Lorette Picciano, RC Executive Director, Rural Coalition, 202-628-7161, Email: lpicciano@ruralco.org,

John Zippert, Rural Co Chairperson, Alabama Association of Cooperatives, 205-657-0271, email: Jzippert@aol.com

The Rural Coalition and its members applaud the completion of the House and Senate conference report to the 2018 Farm Bill, which is the last draft before the 2018 Farm Bill becomes law. The report is a strong indication of Congress’s legislative efforts to ensure that our nation’s African American, Asian Pacific, Latino, and Tribal Farmers and Ranchers and rural communities are well equipped to meet the growing demands for healthy foods and farm land preservation. 

Rooted in the stronger bipartisan Senate version of the bill crafted under the leadership of Senate Agriculture Committee Chairman, Senator Pat Roberts, and Ranking Member, Senator Debbie Stabenow, the package ensures food access for all communities and retains funding and authority for the crucial Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. It also increases support for the Food Insecurity Nutrition Incentives program and related initiatives to strengthen local food systems.

Of great significance to our communities, it makes critical new investments in tribal farmers and food systems and programs supporting the nation’s historically underserved, veteran and young farmers and ranchers, improves transparency in credit programs, removes barriers to cultivation of industrial hemp, strengthens local food and organic programs and establishes an Office of Urban Agriculture.

Specifically, the Conference Report

·      Extends SNAP funding as in the Nutrition Title in the Senate Bill without the very stiff and bureaucratic workfare requirements in the current House bill. Those provisions would create hunger and deepen poverty for vulnerable Americans, including children and families, and burden States with implementation and costs of constructing an underfunded bureaucratic infrastructure.

·      Provides Fair Access for Farmers and Ranchers who attempt to farm on “heirs property.” The conference report language ensures that more farmers — especially African-American farmers and farmers of color operating on land with undivided interests  — can finally access USDA programs that enable them to protect the soil and water, and continue to operate viable farms that feed their communities. This language, sponsored with thanks to Senators Doug Jones, Tim Scott and Tom Udall in the Senate, and Representatives Marcia Fudge, Sanford Bishop and Alma Adams in the House, was developed in cooperation with Rural Coalition with its members including the Federation of Southern Cooperatives, Oklahoma Black Historical Research Project, Inc., Land Loss Prevention Project, and Rural Advancement Fund of the National Sharecroppers Fund, with critical support from the Uniform Laws Commission, the Oklahoma Association of Conservation Districts and support from the National Association of Conservation Districts.

·      Expands and Improves Opportunities for all Farmers to Access USDA Programs - The Conference Report includes language that creates the new Farming Opportunities Training and Outreach (FOTO) Program.  FOTO strengthens the historic Outreach and Assistance for Socially Disadvantaged and Veteran Farmers and Ranchers Program and also links it closely to the related Beginning Farmers and Ranchers Development Program. The improved program provides permanent authority and permanent funding of $50 million annually, shared equally between the two programs. We thank Senators Tina Smith, Chris Van Hollen, Tom Udall, Reps. Michelle Lujan-Grisham, Ben Ray Lujan, Sanford Bishop and many others who led the effort to make these changes. And we especially credit the Senators Stabenow and Roberts and their staffs for their diligent efforts to permanently secure and fund this landmark program. 

·      Legalizes and regulates cultivation of Industrial Hemp by removing it from the controlled substances list and allowing tribes, states, and territories to establish regulatory structures within their boundaries that allow farmers and ranchers to produce a high-value cash crop while retaining federal farm program benefits that were previously not allowed.

·      Provides critical improvements in USDA direct lending credit policy by including equitable relief servicing options in order to protect producers against errors or mistakes made within the USDA direct lending program.

·      Authorizes the Farmer and Rancher Stress Assistance Network, which supports mental health resources and services to farmers and farmworkers who need them;

·      Creates a new Local Agricultural Market Program (LAMP) by merging authorities and providing baseline funding for a streamlined new program. Specifically the LAMP language links the previous Farmers Market Promotion Program, the Local Food Promotion Program and the Value-Added Producer Grants Program.

·      Establishes an Office of Urban Agriculture

“This bill turns the tide for African American and all other historically underserved farmers and ranchers,” said Rural Coalition Vice Chairperson Georgia Good, Executive Director of the Rural Advancement Fund of the National Sharecroppers Fund, which has worked since 1937 to improve the quality of life in rural communities in the South.  We are grateful to Senators Tim Scott (SC) and Doug Jones (AL) for opening a critical new door with their bill to allow families of multiple generations operating on inherited land to be allowed into the programs of USDA that all farmers need to thrive. We further thank Senate Agriculture Committee Chairman Pat Roberts (KA) and Ranking Member Debbie Stabenow (MI) for their patient and persistent leadership to work with us all to include these sections in a landmark package that values all rural communities and peoples.”

According to Rural Coalition Chairperson John Zippert of the Alabama Association of Cooperatives, “The Federation of Southern Cooperatives estimates more than 40% of black owned land is in heirs property status.  Including the Fair Access Act in this bill enables people in states that have the Uniform Partition of Heirs Property laws to access USDA programs more directly, with less red tape.”

“We have been working hard for decades to bring equity to the farm bill in terms of treatment for Black farmers and other farmers of color to build cooperatives and to uplift low-wealth communities. The Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018 addresses continuing inequities and supports the quality hands-on assistance needed to make sure the 2018 Farm Bill reaches everyone," he continued.

Particular thanks are due to the Senators Stabenow and Roberts and their staffs for dedicated efforts to refine legislation and push it to the finish line, and to Rep. Conaway and Peterson’s staffs for working with them to make the important changes necessary to improve opportunities for all farmers. We also thank the many other Senators and members of Congress who led in developing key sections of this legislation.

“The Agricultural Improvement Act passed yesterday is a huge step forward,” said Rural Coalition Board Member Rudy Arredondo, President of the National Latino Farmers and Ranchers Trade Association. “We are extremely happy that the Agriculture Committee leaders were able to stay focused on the essentials of as good a bipartisan farm bill as we can get in this political climate.”

Everyone in our nation who cares about a future for diverse farmers, ranchers and rural communities needs to call upon Congress and the President to assure swift passage and signing, and final enactment of the 2018 Farm Bill.

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The Rural Coalition/Coalición Rural is an alliance of farmers, farmworkers, indigenous, migrant and working people from the United States, Mexico, and beyond working together toward a new society that values unity, hope, people, and the land. 

With our strong roots in the movements for human, civil, indigenous, and farmworker rights, Rural Coalition/Coalición Rural members have for 40 years shared the belief that rural communities everywhere can have a better future and that community-based organizations who have long served the needs of rural communities and people have a fundamental role in building that future. Investments in their work will provide important returns to our economy, our environment, and our society.